12 Days of Christmas Giveaways Day 6

Delighted to have you back for the 12 Days Of Christmas Giveaways from Sew News and Creative Machine Embroidery! Excited to show you what is up for today.

12 days of xmas image1 12 Days of Christmas Giveaways Day 6

Today we’re giving away a Expert Finish Iron from Singer! Can’t call yourself a seamstress, sewist, sewing enthusiast, crafter, or quilter without having an iron in your sewing space.

Iron product full 700x520 3436c6989e8ab532138d6b26bd22ab269536ffa2 300x222 12 Days of Christmas Giveaways Day 6

Actual color may vary

The SINGER Expert Finish iron features 1700 watts, advanced LCD electronic temperature control with 9 settings, vertical steam capabilities, open sole plate tip for excellent pleat and under-button ironing and burst of steam capabilities for stubborn wrinkles. This iron also features stainless steel sole plate with anti drip technology, 360 degree swivel cord and 3-way smart auto off. The iron comes with a 2-year limited warranty.

All you have to do to enter to win this prize is answer the following question in the comments section below:

“Do you know the difference between pressing & ironing?” And, what are the differences!

And, the winner from Friday’s contest is Carole N! Carole N. won the machine roller bag. I will be in touch with you shortly to tell you how to claim your prize.

Visit the Sew News blog tomorrow to find out if you won today’s prize, and for another chance to win!

Jill

head shot200 12 Days of Christmas Giveaways Day 6

 

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144 Responses to 12 Days of Christmas Giveaways Day 6

  1. Esther says:

    When you iron, you slide it around on the fabric. When pressing, you need to lift the iron up to move it to the next spot; especially important when working with bias edges.

  2. Jackie Branscum says:

    Pressing involves a gentle up & down process, don’t move iron across fabric as it can distort shapes, especially when doing quilting as many pieces are cut on a bias. Ironing is the traditional movement of the iron to remove wrinkles from a larger surface.

  3. Trish F says:

    Pressing is an up and down and hold for a couple of seconds and moving on to the next section where ironing is a back and forth sliding motion with the iron. Thanks for a great giveaway!

  4. carla finley says:

    Ironing is moving the iron. Pressing is up and down.

  5. Judy Q says:

    You must lift the iron to press and slide the iron to smooth wrinkles.

  6. Shane Lindsey says:

    when you iron you move the heated play around on the fabric. when you are pressing fabric you are keeping the iron still and picking up to move from one place to the other vs sliding. Gotta have nice creases!

  7. valerie csmith says:

    Pressing is sitting the iron on the fabric whereas ironing is moving it back and forth-which can cause distortion in our quilting fabric–iron your clothes not your quilt pieces

  8. Natalie says:

    I’m not sure but I would guess the pressing is placing the iron on the fabric and leaving it one spot, picking up (not slide) when you need to do another spot. Ironing is what you do to clothing (moving back and forth).

  9. Dawn Watson says:

    Pressing is laying the ironing on and ironing is moving the iron back and forth

  10. Ann Marie says:

    I never really thought about the differences before, I just called everything ironing…lol! Whenever I thought about something being pressed, I thought it meant the clothing press at the dry cleaners…lol! I still have technical terms that I need to learn ;)

  11. kim wemple says:

    Ironing: move around fabric to eliminate wrinkles. Pressing : apply pressure to spot, usually to set a seam

  12. Derenda Laws says:

    Pressing is an up and down motion and ironing is a movement on the fabric, forwards and backwards, back and forth, etc.

  13. Sharon Colburn says:

    In trying not to look at the other comments, I think I do. Ironing is a back and forth motion like ironing a shirt or a tablecloth. But pressing, is putting the iron down and up as you move your fabric, such as pressing for quilt blocks.

  14. Janie says:

    Pressing means no gliding. Ironing is a back and forth movement.

  15. Nancy Hilderbrand says:

    would love to have a steam iron.

  16. Darlene says:

    I iron clothes with a back and forth movement. However, I press open seams and press my quilts by holding the iron in one place, then lifting it and moving to the next spot.

  17. Allison CB says:

    Press – just let the weight of the iron set the crease
    Iron – weight and movement flatten the fabric (and can stretch it to shape)

  18. Eliz says:

    Yes! I had to research a bit, and for the longest time, i thought it was the same thing, but pressing is pressing the iron onto one spot while ironing involves moving the iron back and forth on the material :)

  19. EllenE says:

    Press heats without moving ironing is when you move the hot iron around the material

  20. allison pogany says:

    I think, ironing is back and forth while pressing is just leaving it on a spot for a moment then picking it up and moving it.
    allisonpogany@gmail.com

  21. Sarah McKinney says:

    Pressing means not moving the iron across the fabric instead lift and re-position. Steam is usually involved in pressing as well as a press cloth.

  22. Sheree La Plante says:

    Ironing – move the iron back and forth to remove wrinkiles. Press – hold the iron in place for a few moments to adhere pieces a & b to bind adhesives or to reduce the amount of stretching of bias cut fabrics.

  23. Sheree La Plante says:

    Ironing – move the iron back and forth to remove wrinkles. Press – hold the iron in place for a few moments to adhere pieces a & b to bind adhesives or to reduce the amount of stretching of bias cut fabrics.

  24. Sharon Parks says:

    I have no idea

  25. Julie says:

    Yes pressing is up and down motion and ironing is back and forth with presure distorting the fabric!! Thanks

  26. Wendy Simms says:

    Exactly what the terms suggest. Pressing is pressing the iron down on your fabric and ironing is going back and forth.

  27. Penny Dahl says:

    When ironing, you slide the iron back and forth. But when pressing you hold the iron in one place for a few seconds while being careful not to burn or scorch the fabric.

  28. Penny Dahl says:

    When ironing you move the iron back and forth with slight pressure, But, when pressing, you hold the iron in place for a few seconds being careful not to scorch or burn the fabric.

  29. Sandra Mann says:

    When you press it is an up and down movement it is only to give stability and smoothness to the fabric or to attach it to another stabilizer for such as applique. To press is to move the iron in an up and down and across motion to press and smooth the fabric, being careful not to press too hard so you would stretch the fabric out of shape.

  30. Emily C says:

    To press is place a weight on something, in this case a hot iron. Ironing moves the iron, removing wrinkles.

  31. Kathy E. says:

    I think I know….and I haven’t read any of the above answers either! :)
    Pressing is just applying light pressure to the fabric with the hot iron and not moving it around. Ironing is applying the iron to the fabric and move it back and forth in any (or all) directions.

  32. Ironing is moving the iron back a forth over the fabric… pressing is holding it in one place at a time..

  33. Ironing is moving the iron back a forth over the fabric… pressing is holding the iron down on the fabric..

  34. Lisa Lanford says:

    The difference between ironing and pressing is simple. To press, you do not leave the iron on the fabric. You press.. Lift…press..lift. To iron, you lie the iron on the fabric and slowly move it across the material in the direction needed. Thank you for the chance to win these amazing gifts.
    Lisa

  35. Chris says:

    Ironing you go back and forth with vigor. I don’t iron, except for yards of fabric. Pressing you go up and down lightly, I do this a lot.

  36. Libby Roseman says:

    Yes. Ironing is back and forth…sliding iron. Pressing is up and down motion..no sliding.

  37. Gina S. says:

    Pressing is set it down lift, move over set it down, repeat. Ironing is moving the iron in a sweeping motion.

  38. Kathy McCurdy says:

    I had no idea until I read all of the responses! Thanks for the lesson!

  39. Linda M says:

    Pressing is lifting and putting the iron back down on the fabric. Ironing is slidding the iron back and forth on the fabric.

  40. Leslie S. says:

    pressing is setting the iron on the fabric, pick it up and move to another area without moving it around over the fabric. Press to set a seam
    Ironing is placing the iron on the fabric moving it over the fabric to remove wrinkles.

  41. Deb C says:

    Ironing = gliding iron over fabric surface.
    Pressing = setting iron flat over a section, lifting up and moving on to another section.

  42. Dorothy Reitsma says:

    When you iron you move the iron over the fabric and when you press you lift the iron and move it to the next area.

  43. lisa poe says:

    Pressing is an up and down and hold motion. Pressing is used to set creases sharpen corners and is best used with a clapper during sewing construction. Pressing is also used to fuse interfacing and and applique. Ironing is used to remove wrinkles from ready made clothes using a back-and-forth motion.

  44. Beverly Bradshaw says:

    Ironing is used to smooth out wrinkles in tissue pattern pieces or a garment. Pressing is used to set a sea.m or sewing line usually during the process of constructing a garment or other project. The iron is pressed into the fabric and then lifted during pressing, while ironing involves moving the iron on the item being smoothed out.

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